Category Archives for "Exercise & Training"

3 Tips to Improve Your Golf Game

First things first - this is all information, I'm not going to bash golf or tell you shouldn’t do it. Not only will these tips keep you from getting injured or aggravating something to the point of injury, it will improve your game as well, trust me. The three most often places we see pain when it comes to golf are: the lower back, the knees, and the elbows, all of which are often a result of lack of mobility somewhere or that you are coming into it cold. Each problem area has a tip associated with it to both improve your game and keep you safe.

#1. The lower back

Possible issue: Most often this is a result of a lack of mobility in one of two places, either the thoracic spine or the hips. If your thoracic spine (the upper back portion of the spine) is unable to rotate as far as it should, that rotation when you drive the ball has to come from somewhere. Most often that comes from the lower back. The thoracic spine (upper back), by design, is meant to rotate 5 to 6 times further than the lumbar spine (lower back). When you make the lower back rotate father than it is supposed to, pain is almost certain. The other possible issue spot is the hips. If the hips are tight and can't rotate to transfer the power on the swing, that rotation has to come from somewhere else, most often the lower back.

Tip #1: Doing both thoracic spine warm-ups and hip warm-ups will not only greatly reduce your risk of injury, but also create more power in your swing because you will be able to rotate further and drive your hips through better. Examples of exercises you can do are 10 reps of open book on each side and 5 groiners on each side. Even some foam rolling through the glutes and hip flexors have be very helpful.

#2. The knees

Possible issue: Just like with the example of the lower back, when one place is supposed to move and it can’t, that movement has to be made up somewhere. If you try to rotate to follow through on your swing and your hips are tight, that rotation has to be made up somewhere. The other place it will be made up is at the knees. The hip joint is designed to move in pretty much any direction. The knee is not. The knee is designed to move forward and backward, and that’s pretty much it. Think about it like joints in your fingers - your fingers can bend and extend but what would happen if someone grabbed the tip of your finger and twisted it? Not good.

Tip #2: Hip warmups such as groiners, triangle mobility, and even foam rolling through the glutes and hip flexors will help you gain mobility in your hips and avoid knee issues. Not only will doing these exercises help your knees, but it'll also help increase the power of your swing since the hips are the most important part of driving the ball.

#3. The elbows

Possible issue: This issue is less common and often comes more from a lack of strength in the joint than a lack of mobility. Golf swings involve major transfers of energy and if you aren’t careful, the whip of that transfer through the elbow can cause some issues. Think about what would happen if someone grabbed your hand and quickly jerked it side to side…not too great on the elbow. That’s what happens on every golf swing. If you aren’t taking the preparations to strengthen and protect the connective tissue that holds that joint together it could take a toll on your elbows.

Tip #3: Work on grip strength. Holding heavy kettle bells or hanging from the bar are both great ways to do this.

-Coach Adam

Bittersweet Recovery Week

Next Scheduled Recovery Week: Sept 4 - Sept 9, 2017

I have to admit, this is my least favorite recovery week. Maybe it shouldn't be that way, as I absolutely love autumn, but still, is summer almost really over? 

Truth be told this may be our most important recovery week of the year. The next one is not until the end of December, which means this training block is the longest of the year. My body needs that focused recovery week, physically and emotionally.​

It bears repeating - recovery weeks are not haphazard or just vacation times for your coaches. They are a purposefully planned part of the training cycle, and critical for long term development and injury prevention.

You may have noticed that as we get closer to recovery week the daily and weekly training intensity has increased.

That is purposeful.

Because we are working toward a week of MacroRecovery, we are intentionally working at a higher level.

Then we will take a scheduled, purposeful rest.​

Because whether you think so or not, you cannot and should not train really hard, all the time.

In fact one of our training program design principles is what is referred to as MED.

Minimum Effective Dose.

In other words, what is the MINIMUM stimulus we need to get better - stronger, leaner, better conditioned, etc.?

What? The minimum you say? That is NOT my style. Go hard or go home!

That WILL work, at least for a short time. Until your training overwhelms your ability to recover, and you start breaking down.

How can you tell that is happening? That you're not recovering fast enough from your training? Here's a few warning signs:

Altered Heart Rate and Blood Pressure

You are having a hard time getting your heart rate up, or it's beating like a racehorse when you feel like you aren't really doing much.​

Poor Sleep Patterns

​An increasing pattern of the inability to sleep restfully.

Decreased Performance

Your training loads have stagnated or even decreased.​

Mood Swings

Mr. Crank-Pants, anyone?

Eating Habits Disrupted or Compromised

It's not just a matter of will power. Overreaching and overtraining can cause physical cravings if our bodies are missing crucial nutrients because of too much physiological or psychological stress.​

Decreased Immunity

If you are getting sick frequently (eg. more than one cold a year) your immune system is probably compromised.​

Increase In Injury

This could be not recovering from the normal microtrauma caused by training, for example you are sore for 2 or 3 days after training, or you are getting strains, sprains, aches and pains that you normally do not.​

Lack of Progress (Plateau)

This could be either in body composition (not losing bodyfat/gaining muscle) or not making gains in the gym.​

Enter Recovery Weeks

Recovery weeks are designed to give you rest; physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually.

You see stress is not just a "mental" thing. Do you realize when you train you are stressing yourself out, on purpose? That gets added on top of all the other stress in your life, whether it be work, home, or the jerk who cut you off in traffic. Your central nervous system doesn't care, it just knows when you have too much of it, and it doesn't like it!

​And while you can't stop the knucklehead from driving like an idiot, there are things you can do to avoid excess systemic stress, and taking recovery weeks is one of them.

Here's My Top 5 Things To Do On Recovery Week

  1. Catch up on my reading
  2. Get some extra sleep
  3. Spend more time with my family
  4. Eat at a more leisurely pace
  5. Figure out more things to torture you with. (Just seeing if you are paying attention)

​What about you?

You see you don't have to "not move" for a week. There is nothing wrong with getting outdoors, taking a walk, hitting the rock climbing gym, spending some time on the foam roller and stretching, getting a massage, and/or taking some long showers or baths.

Those things will aid your recovery and help you relax; running 2 or 3 or 5 miles every day (or every other day), or going to spin class, will not

I train hard, but more importantly I train and recover appropriately. 

I am in it for the long game. When I am sick, or excessively tired, or injured I cannot train.

THAT is what sets me back.

Recovery is what drives me forward. On a daily, weekly, and quarterly basis.

​You ready to get better with me?

MAKE IT HAPPEN!

Coach Dean

PS. Below is the "Science Stuff" I promised - Enjoy!


All About Recovery Weeks

Our recovery weeks are what I would call Macro-Recovery. In other words we take a planned week off every training phase in order to let the body rest up from hard training and get ready for the next phase.

But did you know you can do even better than that? We have a number of athletes in the Get Fit NH family who participate in our Bioforce HRV monitoring program, which measures your systemic stress load on a daily basis, which allows us to fine-tune the recovery process on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. You can catch up on that by clicking here

Read on why properly planned and adequate recovery is important for you!

The Recovery Curve

I saw the recovery curve for the first time during my time with Australian physical preparation coach Ian King. His principles laid the foundation for the way we program, train and especially recover here at Get Fit NH. The principles that work with professional athletes apply to us too!

The following illustrates a “good” recovery curve:

The green line represents what we are all looking for – continual, never ending progress over time. We are getting stronger, faster, thinner, better looking (ok at least that’s what I wish for).

Reality Check – ain’t gonna happen. The process of changing your body is not linear, in fact what we are looking at in an optimal training environment is more of a “One step back brings me Two steps forward”.

A closer look at the chart will help explain what I mean.

The red line represents Equilibrium. This is where your body wants to stay, no matter if your goal is losing fat, gaining lean, or both. As you have no doubt found out, forcing your body to change is hard work – really hard work. When you walk into Get Fit NH, our training is designed to elicit that change. But it’s not as simple as “working out” day after day after day. In fact as I am about to illustrate, training without proper recovery is actually hurting you, not making you better.

The blue line represents the “recovery curve”. Starting at the left hand of the chart all the lines intersect. For this illustration that point is where your first training occurred – you “worked out”.

But what’s going on?

Instead of performance going up, that line is actually heading down – this is what is called Depletion. If you think about it makes sense – you have worked hard, you are fatigued, your body is depleted of nutrients – you are spent!

Don’t worry, your body will get over it, if you treat it right! This is what we call Adaptation. Your body wants to be able to handle the increased demand that was placed on it, and starts the process of getting better.

You are in charge of if and how fast that happens. A few of the factors that influence this adaptation include recovery nutrition, stress levels, sleep habits, supportive nutrition, age, and training history.

The recovery curve continues with Supercompensation. Here is how Coach King describes this process:

“It is only when recovery is allowed that we see the super-compensation effect, the unique phenomenon where the bodies physical capacity is elevated in response to training, in anticipation of another exposure to the same stimulus.” – King, I, 1999/2000, Foundations of Physical Preparation

In other words your body has gotten better in response to your training, a new Equilibrium is established and this state is when we will ideally train again. Our programming at Get Fit NH is carefully designed to give this the best chance of occurring, but as I hope you are discovering, you have a lot to do with this with how you treat your recovery!

As you can see, when things are clicking, this process when repeated over and over means you are getting better and better, the blue line is headed up – pretty cool!

The flip side to all this is what happens when the recovery process isn’t working so well.

This chart represents recovery gone “bad”:

When we continue to train in a state of “Depletion”, regardless of the reason, the adaptation to super-compensation effect doesn’t occur, and instead of getting better, we find ourselves in a downward cycle. This can happen when we train the same muscle groups too soon, when we haven’t taken the steps described above to recover optimally (sleep and nutrition for instance) regardless of time between training, when we train too hard coming off an illness, etc. The last thing we want to happen is new equilibrium to be established in a downward pattern – not good.

The long and short of it is your body absolutely needs to recover from hard training. Consistently training in a fatigued state results in injury and illness. Your body is an amazing machine designed to put up with a lot, but it was also designed to need rest.

Which leads us to:

Recovery Weeks!

Face it – you can get beat up anywhere. Our responsibility at Get Fit NH is to help you get better!

That includes recovery weeks. We have found that somewhere between 8 and 12 weeks of training is just about right to take a full week off and let your body recover.

That doesn’t mean that you spend your training time on the couch eating bon-bons, but if you insist on going down to PF and hitting the weights or running 10 miles every morning, your body will suffer in the long run, and perhaps even in the short term.

If you find yourself fighting this concept, ask yourself this – Is your unwillingness to take a week off a well reasoned decision based on what you know to be true, or is it that your attachment to training is so strong emotionally that makes it so hard? You will not lose all you have gained by taking the week off, I assure you! Again to quote Coach King, “…if you don’t (take time off)…most of you are going to lose it anyway!”

So now that we have established you are ready, willing and able to embrace recovery week, what do you do?

Glad you asked!

Three Steps for Successful Recovery

1.) Physical Rest and Regeneration

– Our bodies must rest and recover to prevent over-training (or under-recovering) issues so that we can come back 100% healthy and energized for the next phase of the program

– Focus on maintaining and/or increasing flexibility and tissue health by stretching and foam rolling daily. 15-30 minutes is fantastic!

– Daily restorative walks are beneficial during this week. 30-60 minutes briskly walking (not jogging/running) will keep your body refreshed and active, without negating the purpose of this week. Don’t overdo it!

2.) Physiological and Psychological Rest and Regeneration

– We must normalize key anabolic hormones, refill muscle glycogen, increase caloric intake, and prevent any diet induced catabolism (losses of lean body mass) so that we can enjoy greater fat loss for the next phase of the program

– We have taken the road less traveled by being flexible eaters with a long-term approach to success and thus we will take a break from our aggressive fat loss nutrition plans. This is not a free for all, so stay away from your “trigger foods” (junk foods and sweets) that open the door to excessive calorie intake.

– Instead plan (key word) and enjoy 2 or 3 controlled free meals to reward yourself for all of your hard work, but do not overdo it!

– Caveat: If your nutrition habits have been less than optimal, more than likely none of this applies to you. Instead now is the time to plan and prepare to make the changes necessary to see the results you want. Spend some time with a coach and your Jumpstart Nutrition Guide if you need help.

3.) Celebrate the Fruits of Your Labor

– Take some time to reflect on how far you have come since you joined Get Fit NH in terms of improving your overall health, body composition, and performance

– Enjoy your results!

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!

We would just like to take the time to thank you from the bottom of our hearts for all of your hard work and dedication to improving your health and fitness… keep Making It Happen!

​Coach Dean

P.S. If you are serious about maximizing your training/recovery cycle, you owe it to yourself to invest in this! Look further into our Bioforce HRV monitoring program, which measures your systemic stress load on a daily basis, which allows us to fine-tune the recovery process on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. You can catch up on that by clicking here.

Postpartum Training and Nutrition

For those of you getting ready to have a baby and/or those of you who had a baby in the past year or so, this blog is for you! If you have no intensions of having a baby or you are squeamish then please X out before I make you uncomfortable 🙂

This topic came by request and I am happy to share my thoughts here as I am a mom of (almost) Irish twins and trained right up until the day of delivery and the same day I was cleared by my doctor postpartum!

Let’s talk about training first…

Training feels different after having a baby, doesn’t it? Your doctor will generally clear you to train 6-8 weeks after having a baby. If you have ever returned to training that quickly after having a baby, then you are about to nod your head to everything I write about today. If you are getting ready to have a baby, then here are some things that will be different (at least for a little while) when you return.

  • Core work. Planks, push-ups, mountain climbers, in and outs…all of those exercises are going to feel very different for the first few weeks. It can take your body up to a year to recover after delivery so these exercises may cause some strange and sharp pulls in the lower abdomen. Modification is recommended as you may feel a quick and sharp pain. That is a sign that you need to back off and let your body continue to recover.
  • Jumping. Yes, the rumors are true. Jump rope, wide-outs, ladders, squat jumps, etc will never be the same. It is not a coincidence that you see a bunch of ladies scurry to the restroom after jumping jacks. Bladder control is compromised after delivery.

In my personal experience, these things have improved with consistent training and proper modifications. If you experienced a more traumatic delivery, there may be repercussions which will mean more extreme modifications. In my coaching experience, I have had students with severe hip displacement as well as lingering back issues which have required modification for over 2 years. The point is that when your doctor clears you to train, it is not advised to dive into the performance level on the board for all of the exercises. I know you are motivated to drop the extra weight and tighten back up, but you need to remind your body what it feels like to train especially after baby put your body through the ringer.

Training while pregnant - yes! If you have been training, then it is highly recommended that you stay after it. Here’s my personal 2 cents…I absolutely do not want to know what labor and delivery feels like as an unfit person. That is a serious and powerful workout. Imagine how much “easier” you will make it on yourself if you are STRONG!

Postpartum nutrition is up next. You just had a baby. The past 9 months you have been caving into cravings (or maybe you haven’t) and your body is a little more “jiggly” than it was before. You are determined to get this weight off and tighten back up. Postpartum nutrition should be no different than our nutrition program geared toward fat loss. Just eat real food! This is a safe way to eat all the time. It is healthy for nursing mom’s and babies and non-nursing mom’s and babies. If you want to drop fat, then drop the processed nonsense and just eat real food. The rules don’t change when it comes to nutrition and fat loss.

I hope this helps answer some questions about how you may be feeling post-baby and for those of you wondering what happens once baby comes. We are here to help along the way!

Coach Meagan

Shining the Light on Happiness

I often receive wonderful emails from students at Get Fit NH proclaiming their happiness because of the progress they are making.

On the front page of our website you’ll read: “We love coaching because when you get healthier you automagically get happier, and the world needs more happier!”

How can you argue with that? Everyone needs a bit more happiness. And I’m going to share a bit with you from Theresa, a Rockstar out in Epsom.

“A few days ago you sent me the portion chart for men and women (*Coach Nancy's note: you can see that on the free tools page on The Grateful Plate).
THANK YOU for the "gentle" reminder. 

That took me back in my mind's eye of the very first Nutrition Class I took on a Wednesday evening April 2015 in Epsom NH with you as the presenter

Shortly after absorbing all that information then, I committed that info to memory and followed through

Progress is progress
Change is happening
Life is a constant
Never stagnant
5 almonds = my thumb
3 eggs/ 1/2 chicken breast or any protein that is the size of my palm is my portion at each meal
Vegetables are never measured
Water Water Water and oh yes, more water
This works!!

Tha​nk you
Thank you
And oh yes did I mention to you Nancy how grateful I am for the savage training and epic nutrition coaching coming out of Get Fit NH
Thank you again if I have failed at all in this email to thank you
God Bless Everyone!!
Theresa"

Theresa isn’t alone. She and many others have increased their happiness by increasing their health. And your coaches love to help you.

-Coach Nancy

Understanding Kettlebell Swing Cues

Kettlebell swings are one of the most challenging exercises that we do. They are a serious skill that I think we underestimate. I could coach the swing all day long. There is always something we can freshen up. There are a few cues that we use frequently that I would like to dive into a little deeper. It is important that you understand the cues, why we use them and why it is important.

1. “Attack the zipper” or “Thumb to bum”

We wish there was a more polite way to get our point across, but these seem to work the best. Here’s the deal, with kettlebell swings you have to have your arms up high in the back. In fact, if you are swinging correctly your thumbs should “real life” touch your bum at the bottom part of the swing. If you are not “attacking the zipper” and your hands are hanging low, then you are putting some serious unnecessary strain on the back by bending at the waist.

2. "Reach way back behind out”

This sort of goes hand in hand with “thumb to bum”, except what we are looking for is that you not only keep your hands up high, but also get your thumbs all the way back between your legs (to your bum!). By reaching way back, you will regain the power from your glutes and hamstring to power through the movement. If you do not reach back, then you are likely to find that power elsewhere such as your lower back. The kettlebell should touch the cheeks at the bottom of the kettlebell swing.

3. “Throw the kettlebell back”

When you are the top of your kettlebell swing, it is easy to let gravity do the job of dropping the bell back, BUT kettlebell swings are a HIGHLY explosive and powerful exercise and we are looking to be ENGAGED through this entire movement. We talk about “staying tight”. If you are throwing the kettlebell back, you have no choice but to stay tight and you have no choice but to explode back to the top of that movement.

We could coach the kettlebell swing all day long. This exercise is a skill that we continuously work on mastering. I hope explaining some of the coaching cues gives you a better idea of what we are looking for and why it is important!

Keep making it happen!
Coach Meagan

Aging Wisely

I was chatting with my dad yesterday, and we were talking about fun stuff. You know, like wills, and who gets what, and being prepared for when he "drops dead". (His words)

Just another pleasant afternoon chat with the Carlson's.  🙂

​But dying is inevitable, as much as we don't like to think about. I'd rather focus my energy on living well, and keeping my functioning high, for as long as I can. One of the men I consider a mentor, even if from afar most of the time, is strength coach Dan John. He shared some articles on aging that I think are very insightful as time marches on.

The first is a logical set if measurements for aging. ​

​All 10 are good, but as Coach John does, I think the last three are often overlooked:

Quoting

8. Sleep Zone. When it comes to sleep, Goldilocks had it right, not to little, and not to much. Under 6 hours and over 9 hours were both predictors of death. If either is in your life, get some help to figure out why.



9. Make Some Friends In Your Community. One of the best and healthy things a human can do is be involved in their community. What that means to each individual will be highly different. Whether it is church, a gym, a bike club, a book club or anything were you get involved and share some type of bond has proven to be a highly healthy trait that is ingrained in the human soul. It has as much evidence for lifespan as quitting smoking. I recently just finished Sebastion Jungers great book "Tribes," in it he describes why we gravitate towards things like Crossfit gyms and why we are the most content after natural disasters when we are forced to band together to endure hardships. In fact, during wars, mental depression and suicide go down.



10. Keep Your Joints Healthy. Does your shoulder move in 360 degrees of motion? Does your hip act like a hip? Can you laterally bend your spine? Joints are designed for motion. If they can't, you tend to not move as much. As you can see, a lot of these healthy aging markers will be improved if you can keep moving. Functional Range Conditioning was designed to keep your joints acting like joints. Every morning moving your joints and explore their motion, this is called your Daily CARS. Controlled Articular Rotations. Your asking each joint, hey can you move in a circle without much discomfort. If not, figure out why.

Close quote


This graphical way of looking at time passing by is pretty clever, and also very sobering.


And check this quote out from Original Strength (read the whole article "Does Age Cause Us To Break Down?" here) 

But the weeds and the “facts” trip us up. Sometimes the norms don’t actually show the true story. Is it normal to get arthritis with age? Or is it normal to get arthritis by sitting around and not moving your joints? Is it normal for mens’ testosterone levels to drop with age? Or is it normal for men to consume lots of xenoestrogens from all the plastics, chemicals, and added hormones in food that we fill our lives with? Our issues may show a correlation with our age, but that does not mean that our age is the causation of our issues.

We have to protect our minds by knowing the right things and looking for the real story. Look, our design is better than the norms that fill our world. Our body is made to heal, made to be resilient. But it is also made to carry out its design. What if the majority of all our problems, was the real unseen story? What if the real story is this: As we age we sleep less, we eat less real food, we sit nearly all our waking hours, we live our lives stressed out behind technology that feeds our fears, and we expect one concentrated hour of overcompensated movement to magically fix all our needs? What if its not our age, but our ignorance and our misplaced notions.

If you know things are happening to your body that shouldn’t, don’t accept them or settle for them. Know you are designed to heal. AND, open your eyes. Are you missing something? Are you seeing the real causation? Or are the world’s normals simply trying to corrupt your mind to keep you from living the life you were meant to have?


The bottom line is you have more control over the aging process than you think. You are going to get older, until you don't. Why not do your part to make the most of it?

Until next time,

Dean

August MOVEMENT Challenge

In August we are going to have a friendly competition between yourselves and between the training hours. What will you win, you ask? Bragging rights, pride and of course strong muscles! Here is how it works!

For the month of August (actually starting Monday July 31st) we will have a challenge of the day for Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Those who accept the challenge will be given an index card so you can personally record your repetitions. Your training hour will also have a designated "block" on the white board where you will tally your reps each day for your class. This is a great tactic to scare the other training times with your big numbers!

Monday: Sled push day! For the month of August we will leave out the sled so you can push it (on Mondays) to get points for yourself and for your class. 1 tally is down and back on the green turf. This can be done before or after training. Please just make sure you are cognizant of your surroundings. We don't want to clip any ankles with the sled- youch!  

Tuesday- Sled pull day​! Again, the sled will be out and 1 tally is the length the green turf down and back. You will mark your points on your index card and also on the white board for your training hour.

Thursday: Ski erg day! 1000 meters will earn you 1 tally for yourself on your index card and 1 tally for your training hour on the white board!​ You can come in early or stay late to get your Ski Erg meters in!

Friday is for farmers! Farmer walk with 2 kettlebells or 2 dumbbells the length of the green turf down and back will earn you 1 tally for yourself and 1 tally for your training hour! This can be done before or after training on Fun Fridays! ​

The challenge of the day must be done on the designated day to earn points for yourself and for your team. If you will not be at training then they cannot be made up. All the more reason to shoot for perfect attendance in August!

Who will end up with the most tallies on their index card and which training hour will have bragging rights and the strongest muscles of all? We will have to see! Stay tuned for those cards in training!!!

​Kicking off: Monday July 31,2017 at 5 AM!

Wrapping it up: Friday September 1, 2017 at 7:45PM​

Tara’s Enthusiasm Makes Her Shine!

Tara was a part of the Get Fit NH family before I started here and I am glad she decided to come back! She is an extremely consistent example at the 6:15 class who always works extremely hard and I can count on to give it her all and want to always improve. I would ramble on, but Tara has a lot of experiences to tell you about that I don't want to take away from. 

"Why did you choose Get Fit NH?

I was always very active as a young girl and teenager - I played every sport I could, all throughout grade school and high school. And then came adulthood and I found myself doing zero, zilch, nothing to keep my body active and fit. I have a “sit-down-in-front-of-the-computer” job and started noticing small aches here and there and stiffness in my hips when would get up from my work station and it really made me feel, well, old. I signed up at the local gym on 4 different occasions and, no lie, went about 3 times. It just was not the scene for me. I had no instruction, no oversight and no motivation, therefore, I didn’t go!

I was lucky enough to have a friend talk me into giving Get Fit NH a try in 2010. A two-week trial period is genius because it was the perfect amount of time to get me hooked! I struggled with finding a program that 1) kept my interest, 2) fit with my busy schedule/offered classes early enough that I could go before work and 3) had instructors that would motivate me and most importantly, push me to be accountable. Get Fit NH offers all of these things and, little did I know at the time, much more!

What changes did you notice in the first few weeks after joining?

Well, I’m sure like everyone….I noticed that everything hurt (haha) but in a good way! I noticed that I didn’t have that mid-day sluggish period - I didn’t feel like I need to take a nap at 2:00 every afternoon. I felt stronger and toned and I couldn’t wait for the next work out!

What outside of Get Fit NH has become easier since starting?

I have completely changed my eating habits since joining Get Fit NH. I am amazed that most of my diet is whole foods now and how easy it is. I love all of the recipes, videos and helpful hints that are shared by both the coaches and Get Fit Family.

What are your goals?

I really, really, really want to be able to do a pull up some day :o) Other than that, my goals are to stay committed and be accountable, keep increasing my weights and to try to stick with the 90/10 eating habits.

What is your favorite part of Get Fit NH?​

It is not possible to pick just one favorite…

1) I love the MyZone program. It is a fabulous way to track your workouts and how hard (or not hard) you are working. It keeps me very motivated when the coaches yell out, “I should be seeing everyone in the yellow zone!”. Another great feature of the MyZone is to become connected with other people on the MyZone App. I have a couple of connections and we all can see each other’s workout information. We like to see who gets the most MEP’s per month.

2) The Competitions/Encouragement Incentives. There is always something extra to get involved in with Get Fit NH. Whether it is a 21-Day Detox, a group hike on the weekend, food work-shops, or the famous S3.

3) Get Fit NH Family. I love that I see the same faces every morning at 6:15-it proves that everyone who attends, loves this program and is dedicated. I think it speaks volumes to see the same people, every morning at 6:15 (or whatever time your class is), 4 days per week, year after year. I’m also thankful to everyone who is kind enough to let me know when I’ve ventured off from my group and am at the wrong station :o)

4) The Coaches-I truly admire and respect all of the coaches. You are all so dedicated and good at what you do and it is obvious you are completely invested. You all have such a hectic and strange work schedule - I don’t know how you do it…but you do and I am grateful. Thank you for always correcting me when I am not doing something quite right. Thank you for pushing me to pick up a heavier weight or put the red band back and get the black band, and to ‘get that last rep in’. I may make not-so-nice faces at you when you are telling me to do it but I truly am thankful that you do.

Thank you Get Fit NH for making me a stronger, healthier, happier me!”

I guess I realized in reading this that I talk about protecting the wrists an awful lot…well, if it keeps them healthy, then perfect! Thank you for being a part of the Get Fit Family, Tara!

-Coach Adam

Singers Sing, Birds Fly, Kids Play… Or At Least They Need To

As my knowledge base has grown when it comes to human physical development over the years, I always realized how important physical activity was. However, only in the last little while, especially while preparing for our Athlete Academy for ages 9-12 this summer, have I realized just how important it is to kids. As I coach more and more kids and visit schools, I see things I honestly cannot remember from when I was younger. Kids don’t seem to know how to “play” and, consequently, they don’t seem to move well.

All those things we did as kids, without even thinking about it, are the things that helped teach us how to move well and be active. How many of you reading this remember there being as many kids as there are that don’t like being active? Kids that hate gym, that take no joy in it whatsoever? I understand that some of us liked it more than others, that some were better at certain sports or games than others. Maybe instead you enjoyed hiking, climbing trees, or riding bikes. Either way, you were active. How many kids do we see today that enjoy none of those things? I would wager a pretty healthy amount.

I believe this problem comes from a lack of confidence or enjoyment from doing active activities. A kid that hasn’t played and hasn’t developed some semblance of coordination or physical ability will have more trouble in physical settings and be prone to being embarrassed and not want to do it at all.

The flip side comes from the development side. I want you to think about something before you continue - which was more challenging, your 1st squat thrust or burpee? Or your 100th? (Not in a row, but over time). It is the 1st, right? Your body wants to work as easily and efficiently as possible, but it has to learn how first. This is why the first time you do an exercise it may feel impossible, but in repetition it begins to be less challenging. If children don’t move, play and experience different movements, even hiking or bike riding will be pushed away because they require so much more effort than they would for you or I who have experienced it over and over again.

If you live in a town or area that your kids can’t really get out and play, help them out - do fun things outside in the summer. Go hiking, run along the beach, go out back and play catch with different balls. Just help your child get moving in different ways. Whether they realize it or not, you will be helping them out for years to come.

-Coach Adam

3 Ways to Protect Your Back When Gardening

Anyone else wake up after a day of picking weeds and planting flowers and feel like they just got hit by a truck?

Yard work can be a KILLER on your back. We see it every spring and summer when the weather starts to get nice we start to hear about how planting those pretty flowers did a number on your back.

I think we can all agree that when we are working in the garden, we are in a terrible position. Bending at the waist, sitting in awkward positions to try and find relief…we push through it, because we want to look at pretty flowers.

Good news! You can still look at pretty flowers and save your back from the unnecessary pressure. Here are three things you can do while gardening to protect your back.

1) A super deep squat. Hanging out at the bottom of your squat while picking weeds is a great way to keep your back safe. Remember all of the Get Fit NH coaching cues! Chest and shoulders up, knees out, weight on the heels! This is how I picked weeds for a while yesterday and my back feels just fine today.

2) Tall kneeling or half kneeling position. You guys practice this all the time in training. When you are planting flowers in the ground, try it from one those positions to protect your back from painful positions.

3) Sumo stance. We do sumo deadlifts in training who said we can’t do sumo gardening? For those of you with knee issues try going wide with your stance and hinging at the hips or even sitting in a chair with a wide stance and hinging.

The constant bending at the waist is going to put a lot of unnecessary stress on your back. If you are sick of being in pain for days after working in the garden, then let’s pay attention to how we are doing it!

Flowers are pretty, but with a pained back you won’t be able to go outside and look at them and smell them!

-Coach Meagan

1 2 3 17